Standard Schnauzer.

Other Names:

Mittelschnauzer, Schnauzer, Wirehair Pinscher

Price Range:

$1,500 – $2,200

Size:

Medium

Dog Group:

Working

Coat Length:

Medium

Energy:

High

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

12-15 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Standard Schnauzer

The Standard Schnauzer’s origins date back to the 14-15th century in Germany, where they were bred to hunt rodents, and guard horses and stables. The literal translation of their name is “snouter”, from the German word for “snout”, matching its distinctive beard-like snout. They belong to the working dog group, and are a medium size, in between their Giant and Miniature counterparts. It has a sturdy, muscular body, and distinctively long facial hair. They are squarely built, measuring approximately 45 to 48cm at the withers, and weighing 16 to 18kgs. They have a double coat, which requires regular grooming. This breed is available in several colours, including Salt & Pepper and Black.

This breed is best known for their intelligence, alertness and affectionate temperament. He is fun-loving and loves to be a part of the family, and is suitable for all types of households including those with children and seniors. They can also be territorial, making them great watch dogs. Whilst they are clever, they can also be stubborn at times, meaning a firm, consistent hand is necessary when training them. They are focused and independent, and should be trained and socialised early in puppyhood to develop them into patient and tolerant dogs, and prevent them from experiencing behavioural problems later on. Standard Schnauzers require at least 30 minutes of exercise daily, and enjoy playing and keeping active. They are suited to the active family, and enjoy obedience tasks.

The Standard Schnauzer is a relatively healthy breed. The most common health issues affecting this breed include hip dysplasia, cataracts and entropion. Your Schnauzer should be fed a balanced diet and have regular check-ups to ensure and maintain its health throughout its lifetime.

FEEDING

How much do Standard Schnauzers eat?

1 – 2 cups of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

They get along well with children of all ages

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

At least 30 minutes of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

Suitable for larger spaces

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Standard Schnauzers?

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Osteochondrosis Dissecans
  • Cataracts
  • Entropion
  • Bladder Stones
  • Schnauzer Comedone Syndrome

IN DETAIL

Common Standard Schnauzer diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a Standard Schnauzer eat?

Standard Schnauzers should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. This breed is fairly active, so regular exercise should also be incorporated into their overall health routine.

Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and adjustments will be required as their needs change with age. For the Giant Schnauzer, they can be fed raw meat such as chicken or lamb, as well as organ meat including tripe, kidney or heart. His diet should also incorporate raw or cooked vegetables, such as potatoes, carrots and broccoli stems. Some dogs are prone to getting overweight so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

Standard Schnauzers have stiff, wiry coats that shed minimally. They do not have a strong “doggy” odour, and are hypoallergenic dogs, making them great for people with allergies. Their hair will constantly grow in length without properly shedding. The more wiry the coat, the more shedding the coat will have. To reduce the amount of shedding, their coats should be brushed regularly.

Grooming

Are Standard Schnauzers high maintenance?

The Standard Schnauzer has high grooming needs, including stripping or clipping its coat, brushing and bathing. Grooming is essential to maintain its double coat, consisting of a wiry outer coat and a dense, softer undercoat. Their coats should be hand-stripped every four to six months if you show your dog. Alternatively, the ordinary family pet’s coat can be clipped instead, which is easier and more straightforward. However it should be noted that clipped coats, rather than stripped coats, will soften the dog’s coat texture and increase shedding to an extent.

This breed’s beard and legs should be brushed daily to prevent any tangles forming. His face should also be washed after every meal. Trim his nails every week or fortnight, and keep his ears clea and dry to prevent infections. Brush his teeth frequently with vet-approved toothpaste to remove tartar buildup and bacteria forming.

Exercise

How much exercise does a Standard Schnauzer need?

Standard Schnauzers have high energy levels, and require adequate exercise daily. They are lively and active, and enjoy exercising and playing. If they become bored, they may develop destructive behaviours. Running through the house and chasing the kids are ways this dog will usually indicate its boredom and restlessness. This breed requires at least 30 minutes of daily exercise, which may be in the form of walks, hikes, or active playtime in a safely enclosed area. Like most working dogs, Standard Schnauzers tend to be rambunctious until they are about two years old. Therefore, plenty of exercise is necessary to keep them busy. Even as they get older, the minimum amount of exercise for an adult Standard Schanzer should equate to approximately one long walk a day. This breed excels in canine sports such as agility, herding, obedience, rally and tracking.

Vet Visits

How often should a Standard Schnauzer visit the vet?

The Standard Schnauzer has an average probability of having health issues in its lifetime. Most problems that this breed experiences are typically behavioural.

Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your Standard Schnauzer is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Family Suitability

Are Standard Schnauzers kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

Standard Schnauzers have a patient and affectionate temperament, making them a great companion for children of all ages. Nevertheless, children should always be taught how to approach and handle dogs appropriately. This breed is adaptable, and can be suited to homes with families with children, active singles and seniors. They are a loyal family dog, particularly given their role as personal guards and companions in Australia and Germany. Devoted and brave, and make a great watchdog for the family. Most are great at protecting their homes from uninvited vistors, and can be territorial at times. Whilst this breed should certaily have access to a safely fenced yard, they should be in the house when the family is home.

Trainability

Are Standard Schnauzers difficult to train?

Standard Schnauzers are highly trainable. They are intelligent and patient, and easily memorise commands and tricks. Whilst it is smart, it can be stubborn at times. Therefore, a firm, consistent hand should be applied when training. They should not be given excessively negative reinforcement when making mistakes, as this may cause them to become resentful. If properly trained and socialised from an early age, Standard Schnauzers may become very tolerant in many situations.

In terms of sports, this breed is very versatile. They excel at agility, obedience, tracking disc dog, flyball and herding. They have also had roles in bomb detection, search and rescue, and cancer detection. This is primarily due to their highly developed senses, as well as courage and resistance to adverse situations.

Compatibility with other pets

Do Standard Schnauzers get along with other dogs or cats?

Standard Schnauzers are not always fond of other dogs and household pets. As they are naturally territorial, it is common for them to come off as aggressive towards other dogs at first. However, if he is socialised early, he can learn to get along well with other pets in the household. However, they should be kept away from smaller animals such as rats, mice and guinea pigs, as they were traditionally bred to hunt rodents. Any behavioural problems will best be curbed through correct socialisation and early training.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

This breed loves being in the center of attention! He is fun-loving and mischevious, and affectionate towards his owners. He thrives being in a family as a valued member of the household, and should be raised with plenty of love, training and attention. As a very sociable dog, Standard Schnauzers make great family companions. He should not be left alone for long periods of time, and requires human contact and interaction. Leaving a Standard Schnauzer alone for too long may develop destructive behaviours.

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