Lhasa Apso.

Other Names:

Apso Seng Kyi

Price Range:

$1,000 – $3,000

Size:

Small

Dog Group:

Non-Sporting

Coat Length:

Long

Energy:

High

Kid Friendly:

Low

Life Expectancy:

12-14 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Lhasa Apso

Originally bred as a guard dog, the Lhasa Apso is a thousand year old breed. They served at palaces and monasteries high in the Himalayas and helped to alert monks of any intruders who entered. The people of Tibet greatly respected these little dogs as they believed they were the reincarnations of the holy lamas. They were never sold or bought but given as gifts, and it was considered a great honour to receive one.

They retain their keen sense of hearing and they are alert, aloof with strangers and loyal to their family members. Left un-trained, they can become aggressive towards strangers. They are smart, confident and complex, Lhasa’s love to be the family comedian. Though small in stature, the Lhasa is a sturdy and independent dog. They come in a variety of colours sandy, honey, golden, brown dark grizzle, slate, smoke, black, white and combinations of these colours.

They are a loyal, trustful and intelligent dog who get along well with children and other dogs. They require training from an early age. With patience and consistency, they can become relatively obedient. They are quite sensitive and so do not respond well to raised voices, they can become withdrawn and depressed if subjected to excessively loud voices. They must not be overly spoiled as they may develop behavioural problems.

They require exercise as they have plenty of energy, but they do well with several short walks every day. The grooming requirements are considerable for this small dog. The topcoat coat of the Lhasa Apso is long, heavy and slightly rough to the touch. The undercoat is a little shorter and softer. They do require a lot of daily grooming to keep their coats looking in top condition. It is best to start getting the dog used to being groomed while it’s young.  The undercoat must be combed to help prevent any matts and tangles which can cause skin problems if not kept properly groomed. Even though the hair goes over the eyes the eyelashes are long and strong enough to allow the dog to see very well.

FEEDING

How much do Lhasa Apsos eat?

3/4 – 1 cup of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

May become impatient with smaller children

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

20 minutes of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

Well suited to both large homes and small spaces

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Lhasa Apso?

  • Cherry Eye
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Sebaceous Adenitis
  • Keratoconjuncitivitis Sicca (Dry Eye)
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

IN DETAIL

Common Lhasa Apso diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a Lhasa Apso eat?

The Lhasa is a fairly undemanding dog feeding wise. As they are prone to becoming overweight, they do best with scheduled feeding to prevent overeating. Raw, natural food is recommended, with simple ingredients to keep their long coats healthy and shiny. It is recommended to avoid grains and artificial flavourings which can often be found in processed food. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and adjustments will be required as their needs change with age. Some dogs are prone to getting overweight so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

Originating from the Himalayasa, the Lhasa Apso has a double coat, consisting of an undercoat that keeps them warm and an outer coat which helps protect their coat and keep it flat and smooth. Despite their long, dense coats, Lhasa Apsos are light shedders. Their long coarse hair makes their fur quite heavy, and they shed in a different way compared to other breeds. Their shedding is similar to humans – slowly and gradually, to keep the hygiene clean and lowering the risk of matting and tangling.

Grooming

Are Lhasa Apsos high maintenance?

Although they may shed little, Lhasa Apsos require a fair amount of grooming. Routine brushing and bathing is required, to remove any dirt and debris between their hair strands. If you are unable to commit to regular brushing, Lhasa Apso coats should be trimmed to keep their coat short and sanitary. Due to their droopy, hairy ears, Lhasa Apso ears should be checked and cleaned weekly. Look for signs of redness or bad odour, which may be signs of an infection. Clean their ears by gently wiping them out using a cotton ball dampened with safe, p-H balanced ear cleaner. Their grooming requirements are quite high maintenance, but pays off for their glamorous appearance!

Exercise

How much exercise does a Lhasa Apso need?

Although they have high energy levels, this breed does not need large amounts of exercise. They are happy to stay at home which make them great for condo and apartment living. Lhasa Apsos will be kept content with a couple short walks a day, and playtime with their family. Due to their small size, they do not need to be exercised vigorously, but they do enjoy moderate exercise to maintain their physical health and mental well-being.

Vet Visits

How often should a Lhasa Apso visit the vet?

Veterinary care is essential to a dog’s health and wellbeing, however the frequency of treatment and checkups will depend on the dog. Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your Lhasa Apso is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care. Lhasa Apsos are generally a healthy breed, but may be susceptible to some health problems including Cherry Eye, Sebaceous Adenitis and Progressive Retinal Atrophy.

Family Suitability

Are Lhasa Apsos kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

Although a loyal and trustful dog, Lhasa Apsos do not particularly get along with smaller children. They are rather impatient breeds, and react quickly to teasing and the general clumsiness of younger children. They are also possessive of their food and toys, and are not afraid to growl or snap in defence. However, they do enjoy the company of children, as long as their interactions are supervised. The Lhasa Apso is therefore more suited to adults. Lhasas are also quite wary of strangers, being great watchdogs with their sharp, loud alarm-like barks.

Trainability

Are Lhasa Apsos difficult to train?

The Lhasa Apso can be independent, and strive to be the “top dog”. Your Lhasa may benefit from puppy classes, to tame their independent and obstinate nature. They do best with exercise and discipline with calm assertive energy from their owners, and training methods which emphasise food and praise. Lhasas are intelligent little dogs which can be trained to become obedient with enough patience and consistency over time. They also are known to enjoy agility and obedience training, which provides excitement and mental stimulation for them. It is important not to let your Lhasa develop Small Dog Syndrome, where its humans may allow it to get away with things that a larger dog normally wouldn’t, such as jumping. This breed is also known to be sensitive, so will not respond well to raised voices.

Compatibility with other pets

Do Lhasa Apsos get along with other dogs or cats?

The Lhasa Apso loves meeting other pets, and will usually befriend other cats or dogs. They may become wary around stranger dogs, and not friendly initially, but with enough coaxing and socialising, they will quickly grow fond of them. It is natural for a Lhasa to appear supsicious at first, but careful socialisation with alleviate this. Lhasa Apsos will more or less get along with other family pets.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

Lhasas are often lively when at home with family and friends, and like to stay close to his family. At the same time, due to their independent nature, he also enjoys some alone time from time to time. The Lhasa generally does not experience separation anxiety, unlike some other breeds.

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