British Bulldog.

british-bulldog-puppy-and-adult

Other Names:

Bulldog, English Bulldog

Price Range:

$1,500 – $4,000

Size:

Medium

Dog Group:

Non-Sporting

Coat Length:

Short

Energy:

Low

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

8-12 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the British Bulldog

Occasionally referred to as the British bulldog, these tough dogs originated in England and descended from fighting mastiffs that were brought to the British Isles by the Romans. They were used in a bloody sport called bullbaiting and to drive cattle to market. Due to the cruel nature of the sport, bullbaiting was outlawed in England in 1835.

The breed continued to be developed and improved in the by crossing the Old English Bulldogs with Pugs. The result was a much friendlier, less aggressive and loyal companion and today the English Bulldog makes a fantastic family companion with its sweet disposition, determination and courage.

The English Bulldog is a muscular dog with a “sour mug” face, its build is low in stature, compact and heavily built. The breed is proud and noble, somewhat delightfully grumpy looking in character and has a broad, powerful front and stout muscular limbs.

They are especially good and tolerant of children of all ages although occasionally become protective of them. They are docile, loyal companions and enjoy regular, moderate exercise with a good diet to keep them from gaining too much weight. They will happily become a couch potato given the chance. Hot summer afternoons are best spent in cool, shaded areas with plenty of water as their short snouts can cause breathing problems in hot and humid weather.

They have nice short coats and a weekly brush will help to keep their skin and coats in good condition. The folds on their face (also known as ropes) need to be checked and cleaned daily otherwise dirt, moisture and debris can collect in them leading to infections.
The English Bulldog is known to be intelligent with a stubborn streak however in the right hands and with the correct amount of consistent training when the dogs are still young, the breed responds well to voice commands.

FEEDING

How much do British Bulldogs eat?

1.5 – 2 cups of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

Gentle companions who love kids

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

20 to 40 minutes of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

They make fine apartment pets and do not require a yard

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for British Bulldogs?

  • Cherry Eye
  • Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome
  • Entropion
  • Reverse Sneezing

IN DETAIL

Common British Bulldog diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a British Bulldog eat?

British Bulldogs should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval.

Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and adjustments will be required as their needs change with age. Some dogs are prone to getting overweight so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Keep your British Bulldog in good shape by measuring his food and feeding him twice a day rather than leaving food out all the time.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

The British Bulldog is an average shedder. An all-over brushing with a soft brush for 10 minutes two or three times a week will keep the Bulldog looking his best. During periods of heavier shedding, it can help to use a rubber brush first.

Grooming

Are British Bulldogs high maintenance?

Brush the British Bulldog’s smooth, fine, short-haired coat two or three times a week with a firm bristle brush. The wrinkles on the Bulldog’s face need to be regularly checked to make sure the skin is clean and dry, as food or moisture can get trapped and cause irritation or infection.

Wipe his face with a damp cloth every day, taking care to clean inside the wrinkles. Be sure to dry the inside of the wrinkles completely after they’re washed. Some people suggest wiping the wrinkles with baby wipes that have lanolin and aloe vera. If your Bulldog’s skin is irritated inside of the wrinkles, ask your vet to recommend a soothing ointment. After you’ve cleaned the wrinkles, wash your Bulldog’s nose and apply petroleum jelly to it to keep it soft and prevent it from becoming dry and flaky.

Other grooming needs include nail care and dental hygiene. Trim your Bulldog’s nails once or twice a month. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they’re too long. The earlier you introduce your Bulldog to nail trimming the less stressful the experience is for both of you.

Brush the teeth at least two or three times a week — daily is better — to remove tartar and bacteria. Starting when your puppy is young will help to get them accustomed to it.

As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the ears, nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Ears should smell good, without too much wax or gunk inside, and eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.

Exercise

How much exercise does a British Bulldog need?

Like all dogs, British Bulldogs require daily exercise. Bulldogs should never be exercised in the heat of the day. Two relatively short walks at a steady but not terribly brisk pace should be adequate. If not properly exercised it is possible for a Bulldog to become overweight, which could lead to heart and lung problems, as well as place stress on the joints.

Vet Visits

How often should a British Bulldog visit the vet?

Due to the multitude of health problems that occur commonly in the breed, vet bills can be quite high throughout the lifetime of a British Bulldog.

Veterinary care is essential to a dog’s health and wellbeing, however the frequency of treatment and checkups will depend on the dog.

Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your British Bulldog is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Family Suitability

Are British Bulldogs kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

The English Bulldog has fast become a popular family pet and their gentle yet protective nature means that they are very personable and loyal family members.

His amiable temperament and bulk make the Bulldog an excellent companion for children, even young ones. A Bulldog will put up with a lot from a child, although he shouldn’t have to, and he’ll walk away if he gets tired of being tormented.

Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Trainability

Are British Bulldogs difficult to train?

British Bulldogs are sweet-natured, devoted and easygoing and they want to please their owner. Early socialisation is vital to help give the dog a good start in life. Puppy training classes are highly recommended to allow the owner to learn how to curb any undesirable behaviours early-on. Bulldogs love to chew and most will continue to enjoy chewing toys for their entire life. They also love playing tug-of-war but its important to teach them when they are young to release what’s in his mouth on command. They should also be taught to accept having people take food from his bowl while he’s eating so he does not develop a habit of being protective of his food.

British Bulldogs can also be stubborn and lazy. The Bulldog is unlikely to be an obedience-trial star, but once he learns something, he never forgets it. He learns best through fun training sessions that involve repetition and positive reinforcement through food rewards and praise.

To train a British Bulldog, use consistency and firmness but beware that this dog is very sensitive to the tone of voice. It will not take kindly to being screamed at and will probably choose to end the training session and curl up on the sofa to studiously ignore you.

Compatibility with other pets

Do British Bulldogs get along with other dogs or cats?

With their pacific nature, Bulldogs also get along well with other pets, dogs and cats. They may be less sociable toward strange dogs, however.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

The breed requires a great deal of human contact and will show high levels of affection to their owners. If provoked or threatened by a stranger, the English Bulldog will bravely stand its ground and protect loved ones with determination.

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