Border Collie.

Border Collie Puppy and Adult

Other Names:

Collie

Price Range:

$500 – $3,000

Size:

Medium

Dog Group:

Herding

Coat Length:

Long

Energy:

High

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

10-17 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS75%

75%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Border Collie

The Border Collie is highly intelligent, with an instinctive tendency to work and is readily responsive to training. Its keen, alert yet loyal nature demonstrates that it is at all times kindly disposed towards stock. Any aspect of structure or temperament foreign to a working dog is uncharacteristic.

The Border Collie is a well-proportioned dog, with great balance and capable of enduring long periods of active duties (for its original purpose as a sheep dog!) They are hard-working creatures, and tenacious yet energetic in nature.

FEEDING

How much do Border Collies eat?

1.5 – 2 cups of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

Do best with older well-behaved children

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

2 hours of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

Their physical activity requirements cannot be fulfilled without a yard or open space to run

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Border Collie?

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
  • Epilepsy
  • Collie Eye Anomaly
  • Allergies
  • Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD)

IN DETAIL

Common Border Collie diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a Border Collie eat?

Border Collies should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval.

Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and adjustments will be required as their needs change with age. Some dogs are prone to getting overweight so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

There are two types of coats in this breed. The rough coat is medium-length and feathered, while the smooth coat is shorter and coarser. Both are dense, weather-resistant double coats. Shedding season usually occurs in Spring or Summer. During shedding season, daily brushing is required.

Grooming

Are Border Collies high maintenance?

Grooming is the same for both types of coats: going over the dog with a pin brush once or twice a week, more often if needed, to keep the coat free of mats, tangles, dirt, and debris. His weather-resistant double coat needs weekly brushing to keep coat oils well distributed, and to prevent matting in the rough variety. Bathe only as needed — about every four months or when he’s really dirty or smells terrible. As with all breeds, the Border Collie’s nails should be trimmed regularly, around once a month. Check your Border Collie’s ears once a week for dirt, redness or any bad odour that may indicate an infection. Wipe them out weekly with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to prevent problems. As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.

Exercise

How much exercise does a Border Collie need?

This high-drive, athletic breed is extremely energetic and requires daily exercise beyond just a walk around the block or a quick romp in the backyard. They thrive when they have a job to do and space to run.

A Border Collie who doesn’t work must be provided with vigorous exercise every day – at least one good walk a day with the opportunity to have free running a number of times a week. When they are fully mature, they will be happy to go jogging or trip along beside a bike.

This is a breed for an active owner and not for someone who prefers to stay indoors or who travels away from home frequently. BCs often participate (and excel) in herding events, not to mention obedience, agility, rally, and tracking competitions and dog sports like flyball.

Vet Visits

How often should a Border Collie visit the vet?

Veterinary care is essential to a dog’s health and well-being, however the frequency of treatment and checkups will depend on the dog.

Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your Border Collie is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Family Suitability

Are Border Collies kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

The Border Collie is a loyal, loving family pet who is highly intelligent, with an instinctive tendency to work. They are alert, lively, energetic, full of life and need to have this energy and enthusiasm directed positively.

They are generally gentle and good natured dogs and are happiest when they are with their family.

Early socialisation is especially vital with the Border Collie, entailing positive exposure to a wide variety of people and situations from early puppyhood through to about seven months.

The Border Collie is easy to please and makes a good family dog as long as he is raised properly and receives training from a young age. He gets along with children and other pets, though his natural instinct to herd will cause him to nip, chase, and bark at kids (especially very young children) and animals if these instincts are not redirected elsewhere. Due to these tendencies, they do best with older, well-behaved children.

They are remarkably bright workaholics and require an owner with the time, energy and means to keep them occupied. These energetic dogs will settle down for cuddle time when the workday is done.

Obedience training that starts early and continues throughout the BC’s life will help to redirect his natural herding instincts. Providing him with lots of vigorous exercise as well as having a job to perform like agility, herding or obedience work is key to a border collie’s happiness and will provide them with the much needed mental stimulation and help keep them happy.

Trainability

Are Border Collies difficult to train?

Border Collies are eager to please, are highly intelligent and highly trainable. They are superstars at canine activities such as herding, obedience and agility. They were originally developed for their intense herding drives and not as pets. For this reason, it’s not uncommon that a new pet owner finds training the average Border Collie puppy to be a challenge.

A Border Collie’s intelligence and tractable nature will make him easy to train but his high intelligence also means that he will need lots of stimulation to fulfil his natural instincts. As they were originally bred as working dogs, they require an owner that can invest the time and energy in their training to help the dog live up to its full potential.

Due to the Collie’s tendency of running after everything with the aim of taming it, consider training your Border Collie to stay calm.

Say the command only once – Border Collies are highly intelligent and they will understand the command the first time you give it. After saying it, go ahead and teach the behavior instead of repeating it. He will expect that you will say it multiple times before he responds to if you repeat it when training him.

Use treats to guide him in learning behaviors. If for instance, you are training your Collie how to sit, then you can use his favourite treat by bringing it in front of his nose and then moving it slowly above his head to encourage him to sit. However, you do not have to use treat him every time. You can withdraw the treat the moment you realise that he is learning

Compatibility with other pets

Do Border Collies get along with other dogs or cats?

Border Collies usually get along with other pets.They are affectionate towards friends but may be sensibly reserved with strangers.

Any tendency towards aggressiveness or extreme shyness is not desired.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

A Border Collie won’t tolerate being alone. It’s not enough to provide room to roam; your dog needs someone to roam with and something specific to do.

The ancestors of the Border Collie were selected over centuries for one kind of work. This breed is the type of dog that may enjoy being in the company of her owners, but whose instincts are honed to herding, rather than socialising with people. They are sensitive animals and will “shut down” and refuse to perform any behaviours for people who treat them harshly.

Take care to establish your authority and control as a kind, benevolent owner. A well-trained Border Collie does not fear her owner, rather she is close-working companion who enjoys doing whatever she is asked, simply to please her owner..

Menu