Toy Poodle.

Other Names:

Caniche, Barbone, Chien Canne, Teacup Poodle, French Poodle, Pudle, Teddy Poodle.

Price Range:

$1,500 – $3,000

Size:

Tiny

Dog Group:

Non-Sporting

Coat Length:

Medium

Energy:

High

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

14-16 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Toy Poodle

As the smallest type of Poodle, the Toy Poodle is a highly intelligent, sweet and playful breed. They are a popular choice of pet for celebrities and royalty, and are known for their eager love for humans and companionship. They come in a variety of colours, and have a curly coat that requires extensive grooming, but also makes them one of the most hypoallergenic breeds as they do not shed.

Toy Poodles are highly trainable, lively and eager to please. They require a fair deal of mental and physical stimulation to keep their boredom and destructive behaviour at bay. At the same time, Toy Poodles can easily get emotionally upset if there is too much conflict going around in the household. They are highly strung, and prefer peace and harmony. They are well suited for singles, couples or families, however care must be taken around children as they can be easily injured due to their tiny size.

The Toy makes a good-tempered and caring canine companion, who is protective of their owners. He is happy to work alongside humans as long as he gets enough attention and cuddles!

FEEDING

How much do Toy Poodles eat?

1/4 cup of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

Good for playmates over the age of 6

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

40 minutes of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

Can adapt to smaller spaces as long as they get enough exercise

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Toy Poodles?

  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
  • Cataracts
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Von Willebrand Disease

IN DETAIL

Common Staffordshire Bull Terrier diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a Toy Poodle eat?

Toy Poodles should be fed twice a day to prevent hypoglycemia. However, exact serving sizes will still vary depending on the type of food, as well as the dog’s age, activity level, individual metabolism and overall health.

Take care to try and avoid ingredients such as MSG, artificial colouring, chemical preservatives, generic meats or oils and by-products, such as lunges, spinal tissue or intestines. Instead, look for 100% all-natural ingredients, natural preservatives and wholesome ingredients. If your Poodle does not do well with grains, stick to a diet containing traditional meats such as chicken, turkey, beef or fish. Dry food, as opposed to wet food, is also better for their gums and teeth. Biscuit is recommended to be part of their diet as this will help their teeth remain cleaner and healthier.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

Poodles have hair as opposed to fur, which means it consistently grows instead of falling out like fur. This breed does not shed in the traditional sense – instead, when their hairs fall out of the coat, they often fall back into the coat. They have a single, dense coat of curled hair, which is more wool-like compared to other breeds. Toy Poodles are also great for allergy suffers as they are light shedders.

Grooming

Are Toy Poodles high maintenance?

On the flip side, Toy Poodles require a significant amount of grooming. Their coats do take a great deal of, generally requiring professional grooming, on top of regular combing and brushing at home. If care is not taken to regularly brush their coats, it can easily become tangled and build up dirt. Due to their single layer of hair, compared to double coats that many other breeds have, this can make them tricky to groom.Toy Poodles should be taken to a groomer about every six weeks for a clip of your choice.

The Poodle’s ears will also need frequent cleaning or they will become infected and, especially for smaller Poodle types such as the Toy Poodle, daily teeth brushing is recommended to prevent a build-up of tartar. Ensure they are bathed regularly, about once every week or fortnight, to ensure they remain clean.

Exercise

How much exercise does a Toy Poodle need?

Whilst Toy Poodles are tiny in size, their exercise requirements are quite demanding! Toy Poodles require consistent training and regular exercise to keep content. Toy Poodles can adapt to life in different spaces, as long as they receive adequate exercise. They don’t need to be taken for long walks and are happy to just run around a small back yard. This breed has high levels of stamina, so without sufficient exercise, he may becme high-strung or nervous. Poodles love swimming and playing near the water, so take care when near water to ensure their safety.

Vet Visits

How often should a Toy Poodle visit the vet?

Veterinary care is essential to a dog’s health and wellbeing, however the frequency of treatment and checkups will depend on the dog. Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your Toy Poodle is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Toy Poodles typically should go for eye-checkups, as they are prone to eye problems such as cataracts and Progressive Retinal Atrophy. Due to their active lifestyles, Toy Poodles may also be prone to Patellar Luxation.

Family Suitability

Are Toy Poodles kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

Toy Poodles have a friendly temperament and will adjust to almost any family situation that they are in. They are suitable as lapdogs for the infirm and elderly, playmates for children (over the age of 6), and fashion accessories and companions for those in between. If they are living with a family with children, ensure the children are trained to handle these small, delicate dogs with care. Due to their high exercise needs, they suit families that have the time to exercise them regularly.

Trainability

Are Toy Poodles difficult to train?

Toy Poodles are renowned for being an intelligent breed, so are highly trainable. They thrive on attention and learning, and can pick up on commands very easily. Using gentle and consistent training methods have proven to be effective when training Toy Poodles. This breed excels at performance activities such as agility and obedience, reflecting their origins as popular show dogs in circuses. Toy Poodles are eager to please, and love to learn tricks and games.

Compatibility with other pets

Do Toy Poodles get along with other dogs or cats?

Toy Poodles generally get along well with other pets in the household. They are peaceful and accepting towards them, how they must be socialised with them. Exposing your dog to play with other dogs is a great way to both burn energy and stimulate their mind, and can be done through walks in the park, around your neighbourhood or even at a local pet store.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

The breed tends to develop separation anxiety also, meaning regular and quality human contact is essential. Toy Poodles prefer being with people all the time, and are very human-oriented in nature. They need lots of daily companionship, as they do not do well if they are left alone for hours, as this may lead to destructive behaviour. Toy Poodles love spending time with their families, making for popular companion dogs as they are happy to recipricate love of company.

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