Australian Terrier.

Adult and puppy Australian Terrier

Other Names:

Aussie

Price Range:

$1,500 – $2,500

Size:

Small

Dog Group:

Terrier

Coat Length:

Short-Medium

Energy:

Medium

Kid Friendly:

Medium

Life Expectancy:

12-14 years

Australian Terriers are available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG75%

75%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS75%

75%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS50%

50%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING50%

50%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Australian Terrier

The Australian Terrier, also affectionately known as the Aussie, is a small breed of dog developed in Australia by the British in the 19th century. It is characterised by its pricked ears, docked tail and shaggy coat. This spunky little terrier is known for its clever sense of humour and lively spirit. The Aussie stands at about 26 cm tall and weighs approximately 6 to 7 kilograms. Aussies have a friendly temperament and love to please. Although they can be stubborn at times, they revel in lots of human contact and praise, and do well as a playmate for children. This breed makes a great family companion, however will not particularly get along with other animals in the household due to its strong prey drive. These dogs need to be taken on daily walks but should never be allowed off-leash in public, due to their tendency to chase after small animals. Aussies require a moderate maintenance effort, with weekly brushing to keep his coat healthy. These cheerful little dogs can be bossy at times, so effective training should incorporate reward-based methods and keep training sessions fresh and fun. Despite his small size, Aussies possess quite a big-dog attitude!

Appearance wise Australian Terriers are small dogs with a rugged thick double coat of fur. They have short legs and long torsos compared to their height and are of similar stature to dachshunds and corgis. Australian Terriers are usually between 23-28cm in height. Australian Terriers are also characterised as having pointy ears, dark brown eyes and a pointy snout.

FEEDING

How much do Australian Terriers eat?

0.5 – 1 cup of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

Yes, as long as they are socialised from puppyhood

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

45 minutes of exercise daily

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

No, these dogs are adaptable as long as they get sufficient exercise

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Australian Terriers?

  • Patellar Luxation
  • Leggs-Perthes Disease
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Allergies
  • Cataracts
  • Hypothyroidism

IN DETAIL

Common Australian Terrier diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does an Australian Terrier eat?

Australian Terriers should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and adjustments will be required as their needs change with age. For the Australian Terrier, they can be fed raw meat such as chicken or lamb, as well as organ meat including tripe, kidney or heart. Their diet should also incorporate raw or cooked vegetables, such as potatoes, carrots and broccoli stems. Some dogs are prone to getting overweight so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

The Aussie has a shaggy coat, comprising of a soft undercoat and a rougher outer coat. It is longer on the chest and head. This breed sheds a minimal amount, making it suitable for owners with allergies.

Hypoallergenic

Is the Australian Terrier hypoallergenic?

Yes, Australian Terriers are hyoallergenic due to their light shedding coat.

Appearance

What do Australian Terriers look like?

Australian Terriers are small dogs with a rugged thick double coat of fur in blue & tan, red or sandy colour. They have short legs and long torsos compared to their height and are of similar stature to dachshunds and corgis. Australian Terriers are also characterised as having pointy ears, dark brown eyes and a pointy snout.

Appearance

How tall are Australian Terriers?

Australian Terriers height ranges from 23-27cm.

Grooming

Are Australian Terriers high maintenance?

The Australian Terrier’s harsh, weatherproof, double coat does a good job of repelling dirt and mud, making it easy to maintain. The long hairs that grow in front of and between their eyes can irritate their eyes if left unattended, so should be plucked out with tweezers or fingers. Their coat should be brushed once a week to stimulate natural oils and retain its gloss. It is recommended to check your Aussie’s coat after every walk to take out any debris tangled in his fur and check for parasites, such as ticks. As with all breeds, the Aussie’s nails should be trimmed regularly, particularly if they mainly run on grass as they tend to overgrow. This breed should only be bathed when needed, as shampooing will soften their harsh coat and make it harder to shed dirt. It can also make the dog’s skin dry and flaky.

Exercise

How much exercise does an Australian Terrier need?

The Australian Terrier is a high-energy dog, having been bred to be able to jump and run. They require regular exercise through daily play sessions and walks. Without adequate exercise, they may dig up your garden and begin to bark excessively. Despite their size, this breed requires at least 60 minutes of exercise per day. These dogs should not be allowed off-leash in public, as they have a tendency to chase after other animals including cats, rabbits and rats. Aussies should be allowed the chance to romp and play in a safe, secure area, such as a fenced yard. Whilst these dogs require adequate exercise, they are adaptable dogs and are happy to fit in with their owner’s lifestyle.

Vet Visits

How often should an Australian Terrier visit the vet?

The Australian Terrier is a generally healthy breed, but like all breeds, are predisposed to several health conditions. These include cataracts, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation and Leggs-Perthes disease. Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your Australian Terrier is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check their heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Family Suitability

Are Australian Terriers kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

The Aussie makes a wonderful family pet, and are adaptable to living with family members or just one person. They make good company for both the young and old, and enjoys human companionship. The Aussie can be first standoffish when first introduced, so it is necessary to socialise them from puppyhood. These dogs have an alert, and courageous nature, making them suitable watchdogs which will not hesitate to bark at any threats. This breed can adapt to apartment living as long as they are receiving adequate exercise. The Aussie is also not a backyard dog, so they need to live indoors as a member of the family. They prefer being with people and can become destructive if left alone for extended periods of time.

Trainability

Are Australian Terriers difficult to train?

Aussies are intelligent dogs that require firm, consistent training. Like many other terriers, the Australian Terrier will benefit greatly from obedience training and puppy training classes. They respond well with treats, toys or praise through reward-based training, and short and fun training sessions. This breed is a quick learner, so don’t be hesitant to set them high standards, as this will provide them with vital mental stimulation. The downside of this breed’s intelligence is their ability to pick up bad habits. For instance, if you accidentally reward bad behaviour, they’ll readily learn the wrong message and continue these bad habits. Aussies enjoy progressively challenging levels of training, and excel in agility training and earthdog competitions. Sometimes, this dog may illustrate his own agenda, so training should be firm and strict, but not harsh.

Compatibility with other pets

Do Australian Terriers get along with other dogs or cats?

The Aussie does best if they are a lone pet in the home. Only with patient training will they be able to respect and leave alone the animals they live with. Their strong prey drive means that they are not suited for homes with rabbits, mice or hamsters. Aussies also particularly do not get along well with other dogs, especially if both are males.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

The Australian Terrier is affectionate with others, despite their independent nature. They do exert typical terrier traits, such as boldness and courage but also love to be around humans. This loyal dog is well-known for developing a strong bond with their owner. The Aussie is a good-natured, upbeat dog that should live indoors with humans, rather than alone outside.

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