French Bulldog.

puppy-and-adult-French-bulldog

Other Names:

Bouledogue Francais, Frenchie

Price Range:

$3,500 – $4,000

Size:

Medium

Dog Group:

Non-sporting

Coat Length:

Short

Energy:

Low

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

10-14 years

Available in these colours:

What colours do French Bulldogs come in?
Section 2
What colours do French Bulldogs come in?

French Bulldogs come in a variety of colours, primarily Brindle and White. Rarer colours include Blue, Fawn, Tan, Cream, Red with different combinations of White. Any white should be clear with no ticking or spots.

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the French Bulldog

From his brawling past, the muscular but agile Staffordshire Bull Terrier retains the traits of courage and tenacity. Happily, good breeding transformed this former gladiator into a mild, playful companion with a special feel for kids.

At 14 to 16 inches, Staffies do not stand particularly tall. But, weighing anywhere between 24 to 38 pounds, Staffies pour a gallon of dog into a quart-size container. These are rock-solid, muscular terriers. The head is short and broad, with pronounced cheek muscles, and the tight-fitting coat comes in several colors.

Staffies still resemble the pugnacious brawlers who once ruled England’s fighting pits. But today’s responsible breeders are producing sweet-natured, family-oriented Staffies with a reputation for being patient with kids. These are true-blue loyal companions, but the old fighting instinct still lurks within—making it vital that Staffie pups be socialized with other dogs to learn good canine manners.

FEEDING

How much do French Bulldogs eat?

1 – 1.5 cups of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

Have a good reputation for playing nice with kids

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

20 mins of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

Do very well in apartments or small dwellings

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for French Bulldogs?

  • Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome
  • Von Willebrand’s Disease
  • Megaesophagus
  • Corneal Ulcers
  • Pannus
  • Hip Dysplasia

IN DETAIL

Common Staffordshire Bull Terrier diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome
Von Willebrand’s Disease
Megaesophagus
Corneal Ulcers
Pannus
Hip Dysplasia
Brachycephalic Airway Syndrome

Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) is a pathological condition common to short-nosed dogs, which may lead to severe respiratory distress. Predisposed dog breeds include Pugs, Boston Terriers, Pekingese, Boxers, Bulldogs and Shih-Tzus, which all possess a normal lower jaw and a compressed upper jaw. BOAS refers to the combination of four different anatomical abnormalities that contribute to the condition, including: an elongated soft palate, stenotic nares, everted laryngeal saccules and a hypoplastic trachea. These components all impact the dog’s difficulty of breathing, which leads to distress and increases the respiratory and heart rate. BOAS is treated with partial resection of the soft palate (staphylectomy), nares and laryngeal saccules. These procedures are designed to reduce the amount of tissue blocking the flow of air to the lungs, improving the quality of life for BOAS-affected dogs.

Von Willebrand’s Disease

Von Willebrand Disease (vWD) is an inherited bleeding disorder arising from a deficiency in the Willebrand factor protein (vWF). Like hemophelia A, an inherited blood clotting defect in human beings, vWD affects dogs and breeds at high risk should be screened before being allowed to breed. Breeds routinely tested include Golden Retrievers, Shetland Sheepdogs, Rottweilers, Miniature Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Standard Poodles and Scottish Terriers. There are three types of the disease, classified into Type I, II and III, defined by the quantity and structure of plasma vWF. Clinical signs include a mild to severe bleeding tendency, and bruising of the skin. Many dogs with vWD actually don’t require treatment unless a surgery is planned or lose a lot of blood due to an injury. Due to its hereditary nature, unfortunately there is no prevention or cure for vWD. If your dog has vWD, make sure to notify your veterinarian.

Megaesophagus

Megaesophagus is a common disorder in canines that refers to slow motility with resultant dilation of the esophagus, which is the organ that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. A megaesophagus is similar to a deflated balloon – it passively collects food under water, until a point where the dog regurgitates all that he has just swallowed. Breeds generally prone to this disorder include German Shepherds, Great Danes, Shar-peis, Greyhounds and Labrador Retrievers. There are two types of megaesophagus: congenital, which is developmental and causes regurgitation starting when puppies begin eating solid food, and acquired, which occurs later in life. Symptoms include bad breath, fever, abnormal lung sounds, muscle weakness and wasting from slow starvation. Treatment for megaesophagus is focused on managing the symptoms by preventing regurgitation and allowing food to move through to be digested.

Corneal Ulcers

The cornea describes the transparent, shiny membrane that makes up the front of the eyeball. It has four layers, and corneal ulceration refers to a break in the outermost layer, the “epithelium”. With a corneal ulcer, fluid is absorbed from the tears, giving a cloudy appearance to the eye. Corneal ulcers are commonly caused by blunt trauma, such as a dog rubbing its eye on the carpet, or a laceration, such as a cat scratch or contact with a sharp object. Some breeds, such as Boxers, have genetic corneal abnormalities predisposing them to ulcers. A corneal ulcer is diagnosed by examination and use of “fluorescein stain”, which adheres to ulcerated areas. Simple superficial corneal ulcers will heal on their own in three to ten days depending on its size. For deeper ulcers, more aggressive treatment will be necessary, such as multiple eye drops as pain and anti-inflammatory medications by month.

Pannus

Pannus refers to the abnormal growth of tissue over the cornea, and commonly affects Frenchies. It is a lifelong problem that can typically be managed, but not cured. Both eyes are affected although one may appear worse than the other. Usually a pinkish film begins to develop at the outer aspect of the cornea, the clear outer covering of the eye, spreading towards the middle of the eye. Pannus may be diagnosed by an eye examination. Predisposing factors also include ultraviolet light, high altitudes and smoke. The goal of treatment is to halt the progression of the disease and achieve remission. It is recommended that you discuss with your veterinarian whether referral to a veterinary ophthalmologist would be best for you and your pet.

Hip Dysplasia

Due to their active lifestyles, hip dysplasia is not a rare occurrence in French Bulldogs. Hip dysplasia is a genetic disease that causes the hip joints to form improperly and is the primary cause of painful hip osteoarthritis in dogs. It generally occurs in large or giant breed dogs, however can also occur in smaller breeds as well. It is usually affected by factors such as excessive growth rate, types of exercise, improper weight and nutrition. Symptoms of hip dysplasia may show in dogs when they are as young as four months of age, whilst for others the disease may develop in conjunction with osteoarthritis as they age. These symptoms may include decreased activity, difficulty or reluctance rising, jumping or running, lameness in the hind end, loss of thigh muscle mass, pain and stiffness.

Hip dysplasia is diagnosed radiographically by the presence of degenerative changes and/or subluxation of the hip joint(s). There are multiple treatment options ranging from lifestyle modifications to surgery. These may include physical therapy, joint supplements or anti-inflammatory medications, or common surgeries such as double or triple pelvic osteotomy (DPO/TPO), femoral head ostectomy (FHO) or total hip replacement (THR).

Feeding

How much does a French Bulldog eat?

French Bulldogs should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. 

Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior) and adjustments will be required as their needs change with age. Some dogs are prone to getting overweight so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

The Frenchie’s short coat sheds minimally. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a de-shedding glove will help to remove dead hair and keep him looking his best. Brushing promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat to help keep it healthy. A French Bulldog’s facial folds should be kept clean and dry. The Frenchie’s nails should also be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause a dog pain.

Grooming

Are French Bulldogs high maintanence?

French Bulldogs are fairly easy to groom and need only an occasional brushing to keep their coat healthy. They are average shedders. Begin grooming your Frenchie at a young age and teach your puppy to stand on a table or floor to make this experience easier on both of you. When you are grooming your Frenchie at any stage of life, take the time to check for any scabs, skin lesions, bare spots, rough, flaky skin, or signs of infections. You should also check ears, eyes and teeth for any discharge or bad smells. Both are signs that your Frenchie may need to see the veterinarian. Clean ears regularly with a damp warm cloth and run a cotton swab around the edge of the canal. Never stick the cotton swab into the actual ear canal. If the edges of the ears are dry, apply mineral or baby oil sparingly. The oil can also be used on a dry nose. French Bulldogs do not naturally wear their nails down and will need their nails trimmed regularly. This prevents splitting and tearing, which can be painful for the dog. Keep the facial wrinkles clean and dry to prevent bacterial infections. Whenever you bathe your dog, take the time to thoroughly dry the skin between the folds. Bathe your French Bulldog monthly or as needed, and use a high-quality dog shampoo to keep the natural oils in his skin and coat. French Bulldogs should be easy to groom, and with proper training and positive experiences during puppyhood, grooming can be a wonderful bonding time for you and your Frenchie. If you’re uncomfortable with any aspect of grooming, such as trimming nails, take your dog to a professional groomer who understands the needs of French Bulldogs.

Exercise

How much exercise does a French Bulldog need?

A couple of 15-minute walks per day should keep them from becoming overweight. French Bulldogs do not need a lot of exercise, but they do need daily walks to keep them at a healthy weight.

Frenchies enjoy participating in canine sports such as obedience, agility, and rally. As a flat-faced breed, however, they are prone to breathing difficulties and should never be allowed to exert themselves in hot or humid weather.

Vet Visits

How often should a French Bulldog visit the vet?

Veterinary care is essential to a dog’s health and wellbeing, however the frequency of treatment and checkups will depend on the dog.

Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your French Bulldog is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Family Suitability

Are French Bulldogs kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

The French Bulldog is a very energetic and loyal companion. A small sized, playful dog with a good reputation for playing nice with kids

Trainability

Are French Bulldogs difficult to train?

Frenchies have big personalities and can need a fair amount of training to make them civilised companions. French Bulldogs can be easy to train, but they can also be stubborn. Be firm and patient when training this breed. A fun-loving freethinker, the French Bulldog takes well to training when it’s done in a positive manner with lots of food rewards, praise, and play.

French Bulldogs are intelligent.  However their ability to learn is masked somewhat by stubbornness.  Despite this stubbornness, Frenchies are able to quickly learn the things that are important to them. Proper motivation (such as food) and making a game of the process will ensure their cooperation.

Compatibility with other pets

Do French Bulldogs get along with other dogs or cats?

When they are socialised to them during puppyhood, Frenchies can get along well with other dogs and cats. Overly spoiled Frenchies, however, may be jealous toward other dogs, especially if those other dogs are getting attention from the Frenchie’s very own person.

If raised together with a cat or dog, they may be able to coexist, but some Frenchies will chase cats and other small pets. A Frenchie who hasn’t been socialised to other pets may show aggression towards dogs of the same sex. A Frenchie can show jealousy and competition in a multi-dog household.

Early socialisation and puppy training classes are recommended. Exposing the puppy to a wide variety of people, places, and situations will help him develop into a well-adjusted adult. Puppy training classes serve as part of the socialisation process, promote good behavior, and help the owner learn to recognise and correct bad habits.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

Consistent human contact is required and indoor living is a must. They are not a breed that can be left alone for long periods or left outside to live.

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