Cocker Spaniel.

Other Names:

Cocker

Price Range:

$500 – $3,000

Size:

Medium

Dog Group:

Sporting

Coat Length:

Long

Energy:

Medium

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

12-15 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING52%

52%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS30%

30%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Cocker Spaniel

Gentle and affectionate, the Cocker Spaniel makes an easy-going, family-friendly companion. The medium-sized breed has a regal appearance, with long, feathered ears and a back that slopes towards its tail. It has a long, silky coat that comes in a variety of colours (which does require a fair bit of grooming!) But don’t let that deter you from its loving, merry nature, being a particularly great pet for owners who like to lavish affection on their pets.

Cockers are eager playmates for kids and are easily trained as companions and athletes. They are highly intelligent, and love to please. These active dogs also love to swim, so take care when water is in the vicinity to ensure their safety. As they were originally bred as hunting dogs, they love staying active. Cocker Spaniels are large enough to be sporty, but compact enough to be portable.

FEEDING

How much do Cockers eat?

1.5 – 2.5 cups of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

Good with children, all interactions should be supervised by a responsible adult

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

20 to 40 minutes of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

As long as they get regular exercise, they do not need large spaces to roam

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Cocker Spaniels?

  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
  • Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)
  • Allergies
  • Epilepsy
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Patellar luxation

IN DETAIL

Common Cocker Spaniel diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a Cocker Spaniel eat?

Selecting the best diet can be a matter of trial and for the individual dog. The key is to pay attention to food labels for quality ingredients. The owner can seek advice from their dog’s veterinarian regarding any particular sensitivities or needs the Cocker has. Choose a high-quality food and give it a fair tryout. A chicken and rice–based food has long been a good starting point for Cocker food trials, but consider individual sensitivities, likes, and needs. Maintain proper weight, but be careful not to overfeed. Groomers and veterinarians often see overweight Cockers.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

Cocker Spaniels are average shedders. They do have an elaborate coat, which requires grooming at least a couple of hours weekly to keep it in good shape. Some professional trimming from time to time is needed.

Grooming

Are Cocker Spaniels high maintenance?

The Cocker Spaniel does require a lot of grooming and is an average shedder.

They do have an elaborate coat, which requires grooming at least a couple of hours weekly to keep it in good shape. Some professional trimming from time to time is needed. Avoid exercising cocker spaniels in places with burrs and thickets that can tangle the coat.

Their coats must be brushed regularly. The excess hair around the ear passages and beneath the ears must be removed to ensure the ears are adequately ventilated and that no infections set in. The hair around their feet and that between their pads also needs regular attention. They should be stripped out 3 or 4 times a year by a professional groomer. It is possible, however, to learn how to do this yourself.

Exercise

How much exercise does a Cocker Spaniel need?

A daily romp in the yard along with a brisk 30-minute walk can keep him happy and trim.

The Cocker Spaniel is a sporting breed and should maintain good muscle tone, although the breed is not one that needs a lot of exercise for the purpose of discharging an abundance of energy. Cockers often enjoy getting their exercise by means of retrieving a ball or other toy, or accompanying their people on a walk. They very much enjoy spending time with their people, so walking is a good exercise option. If the Cocker has a canine companion, they can play to exercise each other. The Cocker Spaniel wants to please people and enjoys play, so these are tools you can use to encourage exercise.

Vet Visits

How often should a Cocker Spaniel visit the vet?

Veterinary care is essential to a dog’s health and wellbeing, however the frequency of treatment and checkups will depend on the dog.

Scheduled six-monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure your Cocker Spaniel is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. In these annual visits, your vet will complete a physical examination, take your dog’s temperature and check his heartbeat, among other things. Routine maintenance for your dog gives you a chance to track your dog’s growth and development and discuss any concerns with your vet, and forms a key part of preventative care.

Family Suitability

Are Cocker Spaniels kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

The typical Cocker Spaniel is gentle, a loving and trustworthy family companion who is good with children, other pets, and the elderly.

One of the reasons the Cocker Spaniel is so popular is that he makes a good family dog. He gets along well with children — as long as he is raised with them and the kids are kind and respectful to animals. But because he is a sensitive dog, all interactions between the Cocker and children should be supervised by a responsible adult.

Trainability

Are Cocker Spaniels difficult to train?

Regarding training the Cocker Spaniel, the good news is that in general this is a people-pleasing breed. They want to be “good” in order to please their people, and they are generally sensitive and responsive to correction and a disapproving tone in their owner’s voice. Harsh means of correction are not usually warranted, nor are they productive in the Cocker. The breed enjoys the challenge of performance activities, and it is a good idea to try out the available activities and events to see what interests your individual Cocker and follow through with training. Early socialisation and puppy training classes are recommended. Cockers are rather easily motivated with food rewards and with play and praise.

Harsh training methods will make him fearful, so be sure to use gentle, consistent training to get the best results.

Compatibility with other pets

Do Cocker Spaniels get along with other dogs or cats?

The Cocker Spaniel also gets along with other family pets (given proper training and introductions), including dogs, cats, and small animals.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

The Cocker is not pleased to be left alone outdoors for the day, and he may respond by digging or barking to keep himself amused. He’s most content when he’s with his family, participating in the group’s activities.

Cocker Spaniels can suffer from separation anxiety and best enjoy being in a household environment around people.

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