Afghan Hound.

Other Names:

Tāžī Spay or Sag-e Tāzī, Kuchi Hound, Tazi, Balkh Hound, Baluchi Hound, Barukzy Hound, Shalgar Hound, Kabul Hound, Galanday Hound, Kalagh, and African Hound

Price Range:

$2,000 – $2,500

Size:

Medium

Dog Group:

Hound group

Coat Length:

Long

Energy:

Medium

Kid Friendly:

High

Life Expectancy:

10-12 years

Available in these colours:

Characteristics & Tendencies:

TENDENCY TO DIG10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

SNORING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

DROOLING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

EXERCISE NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

GROOMING NEEDS93%

93%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

BARKING10%

10%

|
LOW

|
MEDIUM

|
HIGH

APARTMENT FRIENDLY

HYPOALLERGENIC

About the Afghan Hound

Its true origins shrouded in mystery, the Afghan Hound was developed many centuries before dog breeding records were kept, and possibly even before the invention of writing. There are many myths and legends about the origins of this breed, but little can be verified. What is known for sure is that for many centuries and possibly longer, the Afghan Hound was bred in the remote mountains and valleys of the country now known as Afghanistan. These dogs were bred by the many tribes of Afghanistan until British Military officers in the region began to export them to the West in the 1800’s and 1900’s.

The Afghan Hound is one of the oldest breeds of dogs found anywhere in the world. Male Afghan Hounds are typically between 68 to 74 cms tall at the withers, and female Afghan Hounds are typically between 63 to 69 cms tall at the withers. The ideal weight for a male Afghan Hound is between 25 to 28 kilograms, and the ideal weight for a female Afghan Hound is between 23 to 25 kilograms. Although their bodies are covered in long fur, if shaved, an Afghan Hound should appear very thin with its ribs easily visible.

The Afghan Hound is an aloof and dignified aristocrat of sublime beauty. Despite his regal appearance, he is known for his profound loyalty, sensitive nature, and absolute love for those he calls his own. The head and face of the Afghan Hound are very refined and show the elegance which the breed is known for. The Afghan Hound has a head which appears small for the body, particularly as it is placed at the end of a very long neck. Afghan Hounds have very narrow heads and muzzles, which taper towards the black nose. The Afghan Hound’s face allows the dog to have completely unimpeded vision. This breed has triangular eyes which are set obliquely. This gives the Afghan Hound it correct expression. Dark Brown is the preferred eye color for Afghan Hounds, but lighter-coloured dogs often have lighter-coloured eyes.

FEEDING

How much do Afghan Hounds eat?

2 – 2.5 cups of food a day

TEMPERAMENT

Are they kid-friendly?

This is a suitable dog breed for kids

EXERCISE

How much exercise?

40 minutes of daily exercise

LIVING

Do they need a lot of space?

Whilst they are true “couch potatoes”, they require plenty of exercise

Top health issues

What are the most common health issues for Afghan Hound?

  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Allergies
  • Cataracts

IN DETAIL

Common Afghan Hound diseases & conditions, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment in detail:

Feeding

How much does a Afghan Hound eat?

Afghans are extremely thin under their thick coats, and they eat far less than their size might suggest. A high quality dog food, possibly supplemented with vegetable oil, can help keep the skin and coat healthy. Ear stockings (called snoods) may be used to prevent soiling of the long ears when the Afghan eats.

Premium-quality dry dog food ensures a balanced diet for grown afghan hounds and can mix with canned food, broth, or water. Your afghan hound may also be fond of cooked eggs, cottage cheese, and fruits and vegetables, but these dishes should be less than 10 percent of his or her daily food allowance. Afghan Hound puppies should probably be given top-quality, name brand puppy food. You should cut down on “table food”, however, since it can cause mineral and vitamin deficiencies, tooth and bone problems, and may cause some extremely picky eating habits and obesity. Clean, potable water should be made always, and make certain to wash water and food bowls very regularly.

Shedding

How often does the fur fall off?

Afghan Hounds shed a moderate amount. Adult Afghans usualy shed in Spring and Autumn, as well as after illnesses. Unspayed bitches shed their coats every season.

Grooming

Are Afghan Hounds high maintenance?

The Afghan hound is a “high maintenance” dog. Regular grooming is key to maintaining the Afghan’s coat. Afghans require weekly baths and brushing to remove dead hair and to prevent the tangling and matting to which they are prone.

Afghan puppies have short, fuzzy coats (including adorable facial hair called “monkey whiskers”) that require little maintenance. They don’t stay that way for long, however. As is to be expected, the long, silky coat of an adolescent or adult Afghan requires regular grooming. Several hours per week of brushing are needed to keep the hair free of tangles and mats, as well as to remove any debris. Keeping the hair clean and mat-free is the key to keeping the Afghan’s glorious coat looking its best. Regular bathing, with shampoo and conditioner, is also required. Like all breeds, Afghans should have their nails trimmed and their teeth brushed regularly.

Exercise

How much exercise does a Afghan Hound need?

Because Afghans are sighthounds, bred to hunt and chase prey by sight, they will have a strong instinct to run off in pursuit of perceived prey; walking off leash is not advisable. Short walks do not provide enough exercise for this athletic breed, and some owners take their leashed Afghans on long runs once they reach maturity. Ideally, an Afghan should have the opportunity to run full out several times a week in a large, enclosed area. Afghans are tall, lean, and strong, which makes them excellent jumpers, so their exercise area must have a high, secure fence. At minimum, Afghans should be walked 1-3km daily, and a fenced-in yard for running is essential.

Vet Visits

How often should a Afghan Hound visit the vet?

Afghan Hounds should see the vet for a full check-up, shots and a heartworm blood test annualy, and as soon as possible when she is ill or injured.

Whenever you determine your Afghan Hound has foul breath along with other symptoms of disease, such as loss of appetite, nausea, loss of weight, bad mood, increasing drinking and urination, schedule a trip to his vet.

Scheduled six monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure that your dog is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. Afghan Hounds are prone to hip and elbow dysplasia, ear and eye problems and sensitivities to anesthesia, tranquilisers and cortisone. Together with your vet, you can determine and maintain a preventative health care program based on the individual needs of your canine companion.

Family Suitability

Are Afghan Hounds kid-friendly and sociable with humans?

The temperament of an Afghan Hound is aloof and dignified. The Afghan Hound may not be good with children because it has been known to be snippy. The Afghan Hound makes a great house pet if you train them properly. They are people-orientated and very devoted to their family. You may find them at your heel as they are eager to spend time with you.

While not aggressive, they are aloof to strangers and don’t care to spend time getting to know them. They are great with children and other pets though – just remember to socialise them when they’re young or they may show signs of timidness.

Trainability

Are Afghan Hounds difficult to train?

Though highly intelligent, Afghans can be difficult to train because they are stubborn. They are highly sensitive to harsh correction, which often elicits a refusal to obey. They respond best to gentle guidance and firm discipline.

Unless an obedience or agility competition is a goal, teaching basic commands such as come, sit, and stay is generally sufficient. Afghan Hound owners are often quick to point out that no amount of training will overcome the breed’s hunting instinct to break off on a high-speed chase.

The Afghan Hound is a very intelligent breed but be careful not to mistake this for trainability. Known to be one-person or one-family dogs, they do not make very good watch dogs. Their independent thinking and proud persona makes it one of the tougher breeds to train. One would have to show high levels of perseverance and keep a gentle hand while training – show or house training an Afghan Hound. One of the reasons that it is difficult to train an Afghan Hound is its lack of interest in food and having a proud personality. Unlike Labrador or Golden Retrievers, Afghan Hounds do not believe in the concept of pleasing people. One would have to be careful while handling an Afghan Hound. Rough handling can make the dog aloof and uncooperative. Owners of Afghan Hounds will have to be mentally prepared that their pooch has to be handled with care and patience because it is a proud breed and that there will be times when the hound will behave on its own accord.

Compatibility with other pets

Do Afghan Hounds get along with other dogs or cats?

With proper training and vigilance on the part of the owner, Afghans can be compatible with both children and other pets.

This dog breed is known to have a strong interest in chasing cats, which is why the Afghan Hound makes the non cat-friendly list.

The Afghan Hound is not the best breed to have around small pets. These dogs were bred to be hunters for thousands of years and some of this instinct remains. Even the most well-trained and socialized Afghan Hounds may pursue and occasionally injure or kill small animals. Proper socialisation and training will reduce these instincts but will not completely eliminate them.

Need for company

How often do they need to be around humans?

Afghans are independent, dignified, and aloof in general, but they are affectionate and extremely loyal to humans they have bonded with. This loyalty can make it difficult for an adult Afghan to adjust to a new home. On the other hand, it can make them fairly easy to housetrain, because they want to please their owners.

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